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If you have found this blog, it probably means you were searching for something that isn’t in the public eye. My intention is to promote awareness of artists that you would otherwise likely never know existed. If you like what you hear, support the artist by purchasing their music so that they can continue to create, and enjoy the release in the quality they intended.

Over the years this has grown into my own personal project, reviewing the artists that I discover and interest me. If you wish to see more of my work, particularly my more metal-orientated material, you can find me as a regular contributor for the online magazine
Axis of Metal.

Pink Punk – Zombie god Delicious

Posted by T. Bawden Monday, 27 July 2009














Pink Punk – Zombie god Delicious – 3.5/5
http://www.mediafire.com/?ngjiimoxmbb
http://www.mediafire.com/?km4citzm5ug

Whilst hip-hop isn’t my normal listening, for those who caught the review of this artists debut you’ll have realised I developed something of a soft-spot for this experimental artist. Combining slam-poetry with industrial rock influenced hip-hop beats, and more prominently this time around, a more trip-hop backing style; it was his no holds barred lyrics, hard hitting and powerfully worded to point out the seemingly obvious in a persuasive manner. Whilst much of the backing work has seen considerable improvement, I find it is the vocals that are lacking.

With a more lavish backing, he once again uses a variety of electronic effects to provide a variety of beats to work over. Once again occasional use of guitar and frequent use of drums present themselves, in terms of maintaining a melody they have easily surpassed previous efforts and provide an unconventional industrial rock infused hip-hop beat that feels complex compared to many other rap artists I’ve been exposed to, though still simple enough to not draw focus from the vocals.

With the occasional clean vocals, and even featuring Yap himself singing at occasional points, whilst both performed well, providing a ‘pleasant’ sound, that shouldn’t be what the artist is aiming for. Before there was an anger, a frustration as he screamed his mind at you as though you were a moron and in doing so a passion presented itself. Initially I thought it was the lyrics that led to the lack of memorability, but with more intent listening they feel as strong as before, instead it his lack of passion. Feeling too content he lends no specific emphasis to certain words and phrases which clung to your mind in his past effort, leading to a lack of impact.

Whilst many may entertain the notion of a more elaborately constructed back beat and tamer vocals, for me the passion came from the simplicity; there were no frills, bells or whistles. It was simple and said what he wanted to say, but here he feels as though he is meandering, unsure of what he’s trying to say himself – a lack of focus and direction poorly compensated by the backing work – the final track featuring a bonus track absent of backing, far more intriguing than anything else presented here. Despite this, he is still producing a fusion of styles that is unique enough to provide intrigue, and the lyrics well worth paying attention to. It simply feels somewhat disappointing by comparison.

Highlights: Old Enough to Die Old Enough to Listen, Calling Time, Outer Space

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Guide to the Ratings
0/5 - This caused me physical pain
1/5 - This is really bloody awful
2/5 - This was below average
3/5 - This was above average
4/5 - This was pretty darn good.
5/5 - I cannot fault this epitome of perfection.

I cant guarantee all reviewers adhere to these guidelines, but work as a general guide.

Author's credit is given on all posts.